5 Common Eye Injuries and How to Deal With Them

eye careEye injuries come in many variations, from minor surface scratches to deep puncture wounds. The severity of the injury, of course, dictates the best course of treatment. Here, we list some common conditions associated with eye injuries and what you can do to determine your next step if you have an accident:

  • Swelling

One of the most common eye injuries is a black eye. The good news is it that the best form of treatment is simply an ice pack. If you experience a black eye, it will typically reduce in appearance over time with no complications, but it’s a good idea to see your doctor to rule out any internal damage.

  • Eye Bleeding

Subconjunctival hemorrages (eye bleeding) is when blood from one or more blood vessel in the eye leaks, causing a blotchy red spot in your eye. This eye injury is painless and typically looks worse than it really is. In time, the blood will clear and the eye will return to its normal appearance without the need for treatment.

  • A Foreign Object in the Eye

If something like metal or a fish hook penetrates your eye, don’t attempt to remove the object yourself. Loosely tape an eye shield or even a paper cup over your eye to protect it, then go to the emergency room immediately.

  • Corneal Abrasion

A scratch on the eye’s surface (or corneal abrasion) is generally caused by getting poked in the eye or rubbing the eye when something like dust or sand is in it. Corneal abrasions can cause eye redness and light sensitivity. Scratches can also cause infection from bacteria or fungus. If you feel like something has scratched your eye, don’t rub it and avoid using an eye patch. Instead, keep your eye closed as much as possible and visit your eye doctor as soon as possible.

  • Chemical Burns

If you get splashed in the eye by anything other than water, it can be alarming. While some liquids only cause temporary burning or stinging and are harmless overall, others can lead to serious injury. Acids, for example, can cause significant burning and redness but can usually be flushed out. If you’re splashed in the eye, put your head under a small stream of lukewarm water and let it run into your eye and down your face. Substances that contain alkali, like oven cleaners and toilet bowl cleaners are much more serious. They can cause blurriness and redness that doesn’t go away. If you experience these symptoms and rinsing the eye with water is ineffective, seek medical attention.

To learn more about maintaining optimal eye health, contact Maehara Eye Surgery & Laser today for a consultation:  or by calling 808.955.3937.

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