Eye Treatment Honolulu, HI

3 Vision Disorders You May Not Have Known Are Genetic

When it comes to your genes, you have more than your parents to thank for your overwhelmingly good looks; you have your grandparents, great-grandparents, and so on. And although your genetics may have played a large part in making your face the talk of the town, your genetics may also give you some grief; especially in the eye department. Let’s delve a little deeper and look at three vision disorders you may not have known were genetic.

Cataracts

Your neighbor’s cat has them, your grandmother may have had them, and you may get them as you age. Although age and injury are two of the leading causes of cataracts, scientific studies also point to the fact that cataracts also have some genetic influence.

Nearsightedness (myopia)

The exact cause of myopia is unknown, but there is a lot of scientific evidence that points to the fact that it is inherited. Although other strong factors play a role in myopia, it’s a good idea to look at your genetics as well.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the number one leading cause of blindness in patients in the United States. Luckily, if it’s caught early on, it can easily be treated. Because genetics play such a significant role in glaucoma, one of the best ways to detect glaucoma early on is to look at your family history.

Take a look at your family history. Do you know if anybody in your family tree has or had any of these vision problems? If so, let Dr. Jeffrey Maehara know during our next eye exam. To learn more about genetically influenced vision problems or to schedule your next eye exam, contact our Honolulu office today and call us at 808.955.3937.

Eye Treatment Honolulu, HI

Headaches and Our Vision: Is There a Correlation?

Having a headache— no matter how small it may be— can turn a good day almost instantly into a bad one. And although headaches can be caused by a variety of things including a cold, the flu, hormone changes, dehydration, and more, one thing that many of our patients are unaware of is the connection between your vision and headaches. Let’s take a closer look.

Headaches After Reading and Staring at a Screen

Try to pinpoint when your headaches come on. If you get regular headaches after doing something like reading a book or staring at a screen, then they may be brought on by eye strain. Even though eye strain may sound serious, it can usually be treated by the 20-20-20 rule where every 20 minutes, you take a 20-second break and focus on an object 20 feet away. In some instances, however, eye strain is indicative of an underlying issue like farsightedness. During an eye examination with Dr. Jeffrey Maehara, he will be able to give you a better diagnosis.

Glaucoma and Cataracts

If you have a family history of either glaucoma or cataracts, then make sure you tell Jeffrey Maehara at your next appointment. One common symptom of both of these eye diseases is blurred vision. And although there aren’t any cures for glaucoma or cataracts at this time, if they are caught early on, we can treat them before they get worse and help stop your headaches in their tracks.

If you have frequent, chronic headaches, it may be a sign that you have some vision problems. To learn more about your vision health and how we can treat your headaches, schedule an appointment with Dr. Jeffrey Maehara at our Honolulu or Waipahu office today and call 808.955.3937.

Eye Treatment Honolulu, HI

3 Basic Ways to Prevent an Eye Infection

Taking good care of your vision doesn’t have to be hard and preventing eye infections is even that much more simple. With a few basic tips, you can keep your eyes free from bacteria and infection for the rest of spring and into summer— giving you more time to enjoy what you love doing, comfortably.

Tip #1: Wash Your Hands

One of the best things you can do to prevent the spread of bacteria to your eyes is to wash your hands before you do anything like touch your face, put on eye makeup, take off eye makeup, put in contacts, take out contacts, or try to get something out of your eye. Germs and bacteria from your hands can quickly spread across your eyes and cause an infection.

Tip #2: Get Rid of Old Mascara

You should replace your mascara every three months. Research says that after about three months of use, mascara starts to grow harmful bacteria on it which can lead to eye infections and more.

As another side tip, never share mascara with anyone— even if you’re related.

Tip #3: Wash Eye Makeup Brushes

Just like mascara, makeup brushes are also a breeding ground for germs and bacteria. Luckily, real animal hair makeup brushes and even many synthetic brushes can be washed with hot water and soap. Try to wash your brushes every few weeks. To wash them, run them under hot water until they are damp. Then take a small amount of antibacterial soap and gently rub it into your brushes. Rinse and repeat until the water runs clear, and all of the makeup is off the brushes. Lay flat to air dry.

Another way to protect your eyes? Schedule regular eye exams with Dr. Jeffrey Mahara. Ready to schedule your next eye exam? Call us today: 808.955.3937.

Eye Treatment Honolulu, HI

What’s the Difference Between a Stye and Pink Eye?

With flu season estimated going extra long this year (through May) the last thing you want to have on your mind is contracting another virus or infection. However, during this time of year, more and more people contract eye infections like styes and pink eye. But what are these two bacterial infections and how can they be treated? Let’s take a closer look.

Pink Eye (conjunctivitis)

There are three types of pink eye: viral, bacterial, and allergic. The most common symptoms of pink eye are redness, swelling, itchiness, fluid build up, and pus around the eyes. One of the most common forms of pinkeye is viral which is very contagious but should clear up on its own. If you get the bacterial pink eye, make sure that you are seen by a primary care physician or eye doctor because if it is left untreated, it can cause eye damage.

Stye

Typically, styes are superficial and look like a pimple across the lash line. And although styes can be contagious, they aren’t nearly as infectious as bacterial conjunctivitis. If you have a stye, one of the best things you can do is to place a warm compress over it for about 10-15 minutes and repeat this multiple times a day until it goes away. If your stye gets worse or becomes painful, schedule an eye appointment.

If you have started to experience red, swollen, and itchy eyes, keep a close eye on them (literally) because they might be the result of a bacterial infection. Luckily, if you have either pink eye or a stye, they are both easily treatable.

To learn more about your vision health, contact our Honolulu office today at 808.955.3937.